Vilnius – full of space

We kind of fell a bit in love with Vilnius, where we have been for the first time ever, bringing »Körper« with us to present it to the public. So many things and spaces to discover, so many things to learn and to look at. We met great people, visionaries from all disciplines, and had some very emotional moments, especially because Virgis Puodziunas, one of our dancers, is Lithunian and has not been to Vilnius for a long time.

Amongst others, we have been visiting the Republic of Užupis, geographically a district of Vilnius, but having declared itself an indepedent republic on 1st of April, 1997. I have noted the constitution in German:

»Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, beim Fluss Vilnia zu leben, und der Fluss Vilnia hat das Recht, an jedem vorbei zu fließen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht auf heißes Wasser, Heizung im Winter und ein gedecktes Dach.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht zu sterben, aber das ist keine Pflicht.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, Fehler zu machen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, einzigartig zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht zu lieben.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, nicht geliebt zu werden, aber nicht notwendigerweise.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, gewöhnlich und unbekannt zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, faul zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, eine Katze zu lieben und für sie zu sorgen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, nach dem Hund zu schauen, bis einer von beiden stirbt.
Ein Hund hat das Recht, ein Hund zu sein.
Eine Katze ist nicht verpflichtet, ihren Besitzer zu lieben, aber muss in Notzeiten helfen.
Manchmal hat jeder Mensch das Recht, seine Pflichten nicht zu kennen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht auf Zweifel, aber das ist keine Pflicht.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, glücklich zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, unglücklich zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, still zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht zu vertrauen.
Niemand hat das Recht, Gewalt anzuwenden.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, für seine Unbedeutsamkeit dankbar zu sein.
Niemand hat das Recht, eine Ausgestaltung der Ewigkeit zu haben.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht zu verstehen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, nichts zu verstehen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht zu jeder Nationalität.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, seinen Geburtstag nicht zu feiern oder zu feiern.
Jeder Mensch sollte seinen Namen kennen.
Jeder Mensch kann teilen, was er besitzt.
Niemand kann teilen, was er nicht besitzt.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, Brüder, Schwestern und Eltern zu haben.
Jeder Mensch kann unabhängig sein.
Jeder Mensch ist für seine Freiheit verantwortlich.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht zu weinen.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, missverstanden zu werden.
Niemand hat das Recht, jemand anderen die Schuld zu geben.
Jeder hat das Recht, individuell zu sein.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, keine Rechte zu haben.
Jeder Mensch hat das Recht, keine Angst zu haben.
Lass dich nicht unterkriegen!
Schlag nicht zurück!
Gib nicht auf!«

I would like to share with you also the story of another space which really moved us, the Gediminas Castle Tower where the »Baltic way« is documented. As we learned, on 23rd of August, 1989, approximately two million people joined their hands to form a human chain spanning over 600 kilometres across the three Baltic states Estonian SSR, Latvian SSR and Lithuanian SSR, republics of the Soviet union. This protest was designed to draw world wide attention by demonstrating the desire for independence for each of the states and solidarity amongst them.

Later that day, Sasha spoke at the press talk in the theatre and said:
»What I feel is great about Europe is that the borders within disappear. On the other hand, the borders on the outer edge should not close. I was very moved to visit the Gediminas Castle Tower and to learn about the Baltic way, to learn about this human chain, a physical »speak up« through the bodies, a collective statement. This is very inspiring for me and I will take it with me from this place. At the moment, Europe goes through a big crisis. But it is a very important crisis as well, that makes societies develop further. We need that. And we should be careful to not let power systems and authorities take over. You can experience for example in Turkey that people take charge of their lives and the ways they want to live, which is very important. I think we are priviledged in Europe, but I see it as a task also for myself, to share, to impart this.«

Here”s a little video with some mini-interviews I made with Johanna Keller from Goethe Institute, members of the audience who came to see our performance and Sasha. I think you can witness also a bit of the atmosphere:

 Vilnius – we will be back!